Asset Building Policy Project

The Coalition for Nonprofit Housing and Economic Development (CNHED) and the Capital Area Asset Builders (CAAB) are spearheading an Asset Building Policy Project, an initiative to increase the assets, savings and net worth of low to moderate households in the District through outreach, advocacy, policies, and greater public investment.

First Symposium Held 

CNHED and CAAB held their first convening Wednesday, July 19, 2017, to begin a dialogue about how we can collectively increase the assets, savings and net worth of low to moderate households in the District. CNHED President & CEO Steve Glaude and CAAB Executive Director Rich Peterson welcomed the full room of participants at the New America Foundation The event featured a fireside chat with guest speakers:

  • Brandee McHale, President of Citi Foundation & Director Corporate Citizenship
  • George Jones, CEO, Bread for the City

Briefing Paper released 

At the symposium CNHED and CAAB released a briefing paper An Introduction to Asset Building in the District of Columbia [download the pdf here] setting the stage for a common understanding of asset building, providing a snapshot of financial insecurity in the District as well as a look at some programs in the District and how others across the country are breaking down the barriers that contribute to financial insecurity. We also introduce Prosperity Now’s Household Financial Security Framework which is based on six key activities – navigating, learning, earning, saving, owning and protecting – and is an excellent way to understand how organizations are deploying resources, tools and programs and stakeholders around asset building.

Join the Asset Building coalition!

If you attended the first Symposium, you likely have already signed the pledge card to join a District-wide coalition to devise and implement asset building policies .

If you weren’t there or didn’t get a chance to sign up, please do so now!  Email Evette Banfield at ebanfield@cnhed.org or Call 202.745.0902 x 203.

 

 

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